Moving Day – Sophia Langlois

I wake up to the sound of raindrops hitting my bedroom window. It’s Saturday…….moving day. I lay in my bed, pulling my fluffy, light blue blanket over my eyes, I wonder “What will my new house and school will be like?”

Dad got a job in New York so we’re moving there today. I remembered back to yesterday, when I asked Mom if I could stay here with Grandma and Grandpa and help them with the farm. But like always, she said, no. Topher and Josh are outside playing basketball, They are on the town’s travel team so they practice every day no matter what the weather is.

I hop out of bed and make my way through the maze of boxes to my dresser. When I open the drawer I realize all my clothes have been packed. I open the other drawers, wondering if at least one pair of pants and a shirt would be in there. I find nothing. I let out a big sigh, trudge downstairs in my pajamas and slippers and sit at the table.

“You ready for the big day?” Mom asks me, smiling.

“Not really,” I reply quietly. “Just because Dad got a job in New York does not mean we have to move there. I want to stay here with my friends!”

“I know you do, honey,” she says, handing me a bagel (with cream cheese of course). “But you are going to be able to make new friends at your new school.”

I take a bite of my bagel. “But what about Grandma and Grandpa? Aren’t they going to be lonely without us?”

“I think they are going to be just fine. Tell you what. What if right when we get to our new house you can call  them. How does that sound?”

“Good.” I lick cream cheese off my face.

Just then Topher and Josh walk in. “Whatcha talkin’ bout?” asks Topher, who was leaving a trail of mud from the front door all the way to the table.

“Go take of your shoes! They are filthy.” Mom grumbles loudly while she gets the mop.

I finish my breakfast and run upstairs to try to find some reasonable clothes. I search the room for my box marked “clothing”.

When I finally see it, I open it up, and my eyes go wide. Instead of clothes in the box, I see picture frames of different sizes and colors.

I take a frame out of the box. In it is a picture of me and my best friend, Lesley, eating ice cream together. I had vanilla and she had chocolate. The picture was taken right before she moved to Boston.

I take out another one. It is a picture of me and my family at the Beach last year. We all had sand and seaweed in our hair. That was my first time ever seeing the ocean.

I am about to look at another picture when I hear a knock at my door. Mom comes in, holding some boxes all marked “BEDROOM”.

“Why are you taking things out?! The truck is coming in four hours and we still have a lot to do!”

Just before I could say anything the phone rings. “When I get back I want this all put away.” She runs downstairs to get the phone, still holding all the boxes.

I shove the picture frames angrily back into the box and tape it up again. Josh walks into my room, bouncing a basketball.

“Do you know where the extra boxes are?”

“They are in the garage. I’ll go get one for you.”                        

“Thanks.” Josh goes back to his room.

I put the box back in the pile of other boxes and headed downstairs. Mom was still on the phone when I passed her in the kitchen. She was holding the phone to her ear with her shoulder while putting the plates and bowls into boxes. I opened the door to the garage and got a couple boxes for Josh.

When I came back into the kitchen, Mom had a worried look on her face. She put down the phone with a big sigh.

“What’s the matter?”

She looked up at me. Her face was red with frustration. “The moving company called and said the truck is coming in 30 minutes.”

“What!” I shouted. “I am not ready yet! I don’t want to leave! I thought we had more time!” I ran up to my room, slammed the door shut, and sat up against it. My shoulders were slumped and I put my head in my hands. Why did the truck have to come early? It feels like they are kicking us out of our own house!

Just then I heard a quiet knock at the door. “Who is it?” I grumbled.

“It’s me.” When I heard her voice I knew it was Grandma.

“Did Mom send you up here?”

“No!” she laughed. “I just came to talk to you.”

I opened the door and sat down on the bed. Grandma came over and sat down next to me. “I know you’re upset, I saw you come up here. What’s the matter?”

“Mom said the moving truck is coming earlier than we thought. I feel like I’m being rushed.”

“Let me tell you a story. When I was just about your age I had to move, too. Our house was getting too small, so my parents bought a bigger one. Like you, I didn’t want to move. I didn’t want to leave all my friends and family, but I made new friends at my new school.”

“Weren’t you sad to leave your family?”

“Well, I knew that I would see them again.”

“I guess you’re right,” I said quietly. I got up and picked up some light weight boxes, opened the door and brought them downstairs.

The truck was already in the driveway and Mom and Dad were putting boxes in the back. I walked over and put mine in.

“You good now?” Dad asked me.

“Yeah, I think I’m ready.”

“Good. All the boxes are in the truck. Let’s go say bye to Grandma and Grandpa.”

I ran into the kitchen, where Grandma was putting away the milk from breakfast. I gave her a huge hug. “Thank you,” I whispered in her ear.

“No, thank you.”

Then I ran over to Grandpa and buried my face in his chest. “Bye, sweet girl!” he said to me.

“I’ll really miss you guys.”  

“We’ll miss you, too.”

I walked out slowly, kept looking back at them, but eventually got in the car. “I’m ready.”

My farmFarm_Kartoffelfeld_Schweden

The city I am moving tonew-york-14480_960_720.jpg

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